The Academy of Management Journal, 50 (2), 2007 – interesting articles
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[German title: The Academy of Management Journal, 50 (2), 2007 – interessante Artikel]

The Use of Knowledge for Technological Innovation within Diversified Firms  p. 308 – 326 
Douglas J. Miller, Michael J. Fern, Laura B. Cardinal

Abstract: We propose that searching for and transferring knowledge across divisions in a diversified firm can cultivate innovation. Using a sample of 211,636 patents from 1,644 companies during the period 1985-96, we find that the use of interdivisional knowledge positively affects the impact of an invention on subsequent technological developments. Furthermore, the positive effect of the use of interdivisional knowledge on the impact of an invention is stronger than the effect of using knowledge from within divisional boundaries or from outside firm boundaries. Our empirical findings have significant implications for the management of knowledge in diversified firms.

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Knowledge-Based Innovation: Emergence and Embedding of New Practice Areas in Management Consulting Firms  p. 406 – 428 
N. Anand, Heidi K. Gardner, Tim Morris

Abstract: How do innovative knowledge-based structures emerge and become embedded in organizations? We drew on theories of knowledge-intensive firms, communities of practice, and professional service firms to analyze multiple cases of new practice area creation in management consulting firms. Our qualitative analysis identified four critical generative elements: socialized agency, differentiated expertise, defensible turf, and organizational support. We demonstrate that these elements must be combined in specific pathways for knowledge-based innovative structures to emerge and embed. These pathways emerge from practitioner networks, markets for knowledgebased services, and professional firms’ hierarchies. Our findings have important implications for studying innovation in the knowledge-based economy.

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Death Hurts, But It Isn’t Fatal: The Postexit Diffusion of Knowledge Created by Innovative Companies  p. 446 – 467
Glenn Hoetker, Rajshree Agarwal

Abstract: There is little understanding of whether a firm’s innovative knowledge dies with it or if instead significant diffusion of knowledge occurs even after a firm exits an industry. Theoretical predictions about the differing effects of firm exit on private and public knowledge and implications for interfirm knowledge transfer are forwarded. We investigated main and moderating effects of a firm’s exit from the disk drive industry on knowledge diffusion to other firms, finding evidence that the ability to use a firm as a template plays a critical role in successfully replicating its knowledge. Absent this template, knowledge “stickiness” reduces knowledge diffusion.

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© 2007 Academy of Management. All rights reserved.


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